MAR 17, 2022 9:00 AM PDT

Coffee May Lower Risk of Heart Failure

WRITTEN BY: Savannah Logan

According to the American Heart Association, caffeinated coffee may lower the risk of heart failure. A recent analysis in Circulation: Heart Failure combined data from three large heart disease trials to study potential lifestyle and behavioral risk factors associated with coronary heart disease, heart failure, and stroke. In all three studies, higher coffee intake was associated with a lower risk of heart failure. This benefit of coffee drinking did not apply to decaffeinated coffee, suggesting that caffeine may play a role in diminishing the risk of heart disease.

The dietary factors that may influence the risk of heart failure are not well known, unlike many other forms of heart disease. Heart failure occurs when the heart no longer has the ability to pump sufficient blood throughout the body, and it can occur for a variety of reasons. While the mechanism is unclear, coffee consumption showed a clear relationship with decreased risk.

Several other studies have shown a positive relationship between coffee consumption and heart health. Higher consumption of caffeinated coffee has been associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in older adults, and a recent umbrella review found that increasing coffee consumption was associated with decreased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in a range of populations.

While caffeinated coffee showed a clear association with lower risk of heart failure, the authors of the Circulation: Heart Failure study noted that their evidence is not as strong as the evidence behind quitting smoking, losing weight, and increasing physical activity to improve heart health. Caffeinated coffee will not solve all your heart problems, but in moderation it may improve heart health as an addition to a well-balanced diet and exercise routine.

Sources: American Heart Association, Circulation: Heart Failure, Am J Cardiol, BMJ

About the Author
PhD in Biophysics
Savannah (she/her) is a scientific writer specializing in cardiology at Labroots. Her background is in medical writing with significant experience in obesity, oncology, and infectious diseases. She has conducted research in microbial biophysics, optics, and education. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Oregon.
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