JUN 30, 2022 9:00 AM PDT

Greenlanders Face Genetic Heart Risks

WRITTEN BY: Savannah Logan

A new study published in Human Genetics and Genomics Advances has shown that almost 30% of people from Greenland have a genetic variant that increases their risk of high cholesterol and cardiovascular disease.

The genetic variant, called p.G137S, is common in Arctic populations and has recently been associated with elevated lipid levels. This study included over 5,000 Greenlanders and tested for associations between the presence of the genetic variant and the metabolic health and cardiovascular disease risk of participants.

Of those participating in the study, almost 30% carried at least one copy of the allele. Those with the variant were at an increased risk of having heart disease, artery disease, and heart operations. Many of the carriers also had high levels of LDL cholesterol.

The study’s authors noted that this work shows that the genetic variant has an even greater effect on lipid profiles than previously thought. Given their results, a screening profile for the genetic variant could be very useful for improving the health of Greenlanders. By using a screening program for early identification of those at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, healthcare providers could implement earlier interventions and improve preventative care.

While genetics can play a major role in cholesterol and heart health, other factors can also have a strong impact on the heart and one’s risk of cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle choices like eating a diet rich in unprocessed foods, vegetables, and whole grains will improve heart health, and regular moderate-to-vigorous intensity exercise strengthens the heart. Avoiding smoking, weight gain, and stress also improve heart health. For those at a higher genetic risk of heart disease, early intervention and some medications may be beneficial.

Sources: Human Genetics and Genomics Advances, Science Daily

 

About the Author
PhD in Biophysics
Savannah (she/her) is a scientific writer specializing in cardiology at Labroots. Her background is in medical writing with significant experience in obesity, oncology, and infectious diseases. She has conducted research in microbial biophysics, optics, and education. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Oregon.
You May Also Like
MAR 03, 2022
Technology
A Robot That Can Measure Blood Pressure With A Single Touch
MAR 03, 2022
A Robot That Can Measure Blood Pressure With A Single Touch
High blood pressure is a silent condition that shows no signs or symptoms. And yet, according to the CDC, millions of Am ...
MAR 03, 2022
Drug Discovery & Development
Blood Pressure Drug Increases Natural Insulin Production in Type 1 Diabetes
MAR 03, 2022
Blood Pressure Drug Increases Natural Insulin Production in Type 1 Diabetes
Individuals with type 1 diabetes who take blood pressure medication verapamil require less insulin on a daily basis. The ...
APR 06, 2022
Cardiology
Are Leadless Pacemakers the Future?
APR 06, 2022
Are Leadless Pacemakers the Future?
The human heart rate is under the influence of various hormonal and neural control mechanisms. Normally, conduction of a ...
MAY 09, 2022
Clinical & Molecular DX
COVID-19 Vaccine Technique Guiding Heart Disease Research
MAY 09, 2022
COVID-19 Vaccine Technique Guiding Heart Disease Research
The heart is made up in part of cardiomyocytes, specialized cells responsible for controlling heart beats. After a heart ...
MAY 12, 2022
Plants & Animals
Coffee's Impact on Cholesterol Depends on Drinker Sex, Brewing Method
MAY 12, 2022
Coffee's Impact on Cholesterol Depends on Drinker Sex, Brewing Method
Coffee is one of the most popular beverages on the planet. Produced from the seeds of the Coffea plant, coffee beans are ...
JUN 14, 2022
Cardiology
Weight Training Effectively Combats Obesity
JUN 14, 2022
Weight Training Effectively Combats Obesity
Aerobic exercise is typically associated with weight loss, but weight training also improves weight reduction and may ha ...
Loading Comments...