OCT 07, 2020 9:00 AM PDT

Discovery of Phosphine on Venus - What Does It Mean?

WRITTEN BY: Daniel Duan

A Nature Astronomy paper in September, titled "Phosphine gas in the cloud decks of Venus", has led to an exploding curiosity toward our planetry neighbor and increasing speculation of alien life forms on Earth's "hellish" twin. However, the news might have also got you scratching your head: why does the finding of a single, inorganic compound has any connection to life beyond Earth?

The international team of scientists behind the research first spoted phosphine's molecular "fingerprints", a unique pattern in spectral absoprtion, back in mid-2017, using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in Hawaii. In 2019, a study using the ALMA telescope in Northern Chile confirmed the earlier findings, and also determined the atmospheric concentration of the compound to be about 20 parts per billion (ppb).

Phosphine (PH3) is a flammable, odorless, and highly toxic gas. It was first artificially produced in the lab in the late eighteenth century by chemist Philippe Gengembre, who heat up white phosphorus in a solution of potassium fertilizer. The synthesis of phosphine through inorganic reactions is possible but its synthesis require a huge input of energy. And given the raw materials and the environmental conditions on Venus, scientists found it unlike for phosphine to be so concentrated without any involvement of biological processes. 

Therefore, the researchers concluded that the discovery of phosphine in the upper atmosphere of Venus could be an indication of "the presence of life" on the planet.

Source: Seeker via Youtube

About the Author
  • Graduated with a bachelor degree in Pharmaceutical Science and a master degree in neuropharmacology, Daniel is a radiopharmaceutical and radiobiology expert based in Ottawa, Canada. With years of experience in biomedical R&D, Daniel is very into writing. He is constantly fascinated by what's happening in the world of science. He hopes to capture the public's interest and promote scientific literacy with his trending news articles. The recurring topics in his Chemistry & Physics trending news section include alternative energy, material science, theoretical physics, medical imaging, and green chemistry.
You May Also Like
JAN 27, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Air purifiers may increase the spread of viral transmission, not hinder it
JAN 27, 2021
Air purifiers may increase the spread of viral transmission, not hinder it
A recent study published in Physics of Fluids, from AIP Publishing, sheds new light on the pros and cons of air pur ...
FEB 14, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Enhancing fluorescence signals from biomarkers using nanotechnology
FEB 14, 2021
Enhancing fluorescence signals from biomarkers using nanotechnology
In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LM ...
FEB 19, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Ultraviolet TV for animals - and what it can teach us
FEB 19, 2021
Ultraviolet TV for animals - and what it can teach us
Does your dog like watching TV with you? Chances are probably not, because dogs’ eyes see light much faster than h ...
MAR 13, 2021
Cell & Molecular Biology
Pencil-Eraser Tool Can Selectively Modify Proteins
MAR 13, 2021
Pencil-Eraser Tool Can Selectively Modify Proteins
Carbohydrates are essential sources of energy, but sugar molecules serve a variety of other biological functions as well ...
MAR 25, 2021
Clinical & Molecular DX
Police Speeding Radar Technology Used to Catch Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria
MAR 25, 2021
Police Speeding Radar Technology Used to Catch Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria
Doppler radars are used by cops to catch speeding drivers, in spacecraft navigation, and for forecasting the weather. No ...
APR 20, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Warning: public restroom ahead, high levels of aerosol particles
APR 20, 2021
Warning: public restroom ahead, high levels of aerosol particles
New research on the aerosolization of pathogens provides recommendations for public restroom use. According to the study ...
Loading Comments...