FEB 11, 2022 10:30 AM PST

New Prostate Cancer Drug Effective in Dogs, Promising for Humans

WRITTEN BY: Ryan Vingum

Prostate cancer affects about one in eight men each year, and is one of the most common types of cancer in men). Researchers have been studying novel therapeutic approaches for years. And when it comes to studying prostate cancer drugs (and, in fact, many drugs) mice are usually the go to for testing. However, mice and humans have so many differences that it’s often been hard to take findings from mice studies and translate them into meaningful insight for human treatment.

To overcome this hurdle, researchers turned to man’s best friend, which has proven beneficial in understanding prostate cancer treatment. 

According to a new study published in Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, researchers outline experiments testing a potential prostate cancer drug candidate (mogamulizumab) on dogs, with hopeful results.

The drug in question, mogamulizumab, is an antibody drug designed to block the CCR4 receptor, which researchers believe may play a role in regulating the activity of “Tregs,” or regulatory T cells. The hypothesis is that Tregs hamper the immune system’s ability to identify and attack prostate tumor cells. Tregs do play an important role in the body by helping the immune system differentiate good and bad cells to prevent harm to the body. But some types of cancer cells can cloak themselves from Treg cells, usually signaled by a buildup of Tregs around tumors. 

Researchers chose to study mogamulizumab in dogs for several reasons, not least of which is the fact that prostate cancer in both humans and dogs presents with very similar clinical characteristics (such as onset in older age). It’s also a cancer that happens frequently in both species. Taken together, dogs could provide an alternative way to study prostate cancer drugs compared to mice studies. Researchers hope that what they learn working with dogs may offer more meaningful insight into how drugs could work in humans. 

The study in ImmunoTherapy reports on a preclinical trial of mogamulizumab in dogs with a control group. Results were promising, with dogs receiving mogamulizumab showing a decreased amount of Tregs circulating near tumors and increased survival rates. Researchers hope to begin clinical trials in humans soon.

Sources: Science Daily; ImmunoTherapy of Cancer; Cancer.org

About the Author
Professional Writing
Science writer and editor, with a focus on simplifying complex information about health, medicine, technology, and clinical drug development for a general audience.
You May Also Like
APR 13, 2022
Infographics
Pesticides 101
APR 13, 2022
Pesticides 101
Pesticides are used across multiple facets of life- from our food chain to buliding materials and gardening. But wh ...
APR 14, 2022
Earth & The Environment
Confirmation Bias or Captivating Discovery? Paleontology at the Tanis Site, North Dakota
APR 14, 2022
Confirmation Bias or Captivating Discovery? Paleontology at the Tanis Site, North Dakota
In 2020, when I was still working at a small natural history museum in Hot Springs, South Dakota, I started to hear whis ...
APR 21, 2022
Chemistry & Physics
Making LEDs from Discarded Rice Husks
APR 21, 2022
Making LEDs from Discarded Rice Husks
Researchers from Hiroshima University in Japan have discovered an innovative way to turn discarded rice husks into light ...
MAY 06, 2022
Cannabis Sciences
What's hemp packaging, and why does it matter?
MAY 06, 2022
What's hemp packaging, and why does it matter?
Hemp packaging is the latest craze in sustainability. Here's what's behind it, and why advocates say it's effective.
MAY 13, 2022
Chemistry & Physics
How Do Bananas Ripen? The Dynamics of Spot Formation Reveal Secrets About Keeping the Fruit Fresh
MAY 13, 2022
How Do Bananas Ripen? The Dynamics of Spot Formation Reveal Secrets About Keeping the Fruit Fresh
A study out of Florida State University sets the foundation to reduce the 50 million tons of food waste per year linked ...
JUN 09, 2022
Technology
Artificial cilia could someday power diagnostic devices
JUN 09, 2022
Artificial cilia could someday power diagnostic devices
All living organisms are made of cells, as cells are the basic units of life. Cells are magnificent little things and th ...
Loading Comments...