FEB 28, 2022 10:00 AM PST

We Will Find Life on Pluto

The search for life beyond Earth has reached a fever pitch, with possible locations to find even microbial life being Mars, Jupiter’s moon Europa, Saturn’s moons Titan and Enceladus, Neptune’s moon Triton, and even the clouds of hellish Venus. Countless missions have been sent to these amazing worlds, with many more having been approved and given speculative launch dates, including NASA’s Europa Clipper mission and NASA’s DAVINVI+ and VERITAS missions to Venus in the next few years.

But what about Pluto? Why can’t this distant world just chilling (pun intended) way out in the Kuiper Belt have the potential for life, too? Have we allowed Pluto’s reclassification as a dwarf planet to make us doubtful to the possibility for life there? Maybe it’s the vast distance from Earth, given how it took NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft nine years to travel the void to accomplish a quick flyby of this small icy world. However, that short flyby revealed a much different world that we initially envisioned. We literally saw a world with mountains, valleys, and plains, along with craters, indicating a (relatively) young surface, and one that scientists have indicated might even be geologically active today. Other studies have indicated the possibility of a subsurface liquid water ocean on Pluto either currently or in its past, oceans that have been shown to already exist on Europa and Enceladus.

Image Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Image Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Image Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Image Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Given the incredible distance and time it takes for conventional spacecrafts to reach Pluto, it might be several decades until we visit this icy world again. But this is why we do science, and this is the essence of exploration, to see what’s around the next bend in the road and visit far away worlds unknown. If life exists there, either on its surface or just beneath, what will it be like? Will it resemble “life as we know it”, or something entirely new and different? The search for life beyond Earth is ratcheting up as the possibilities of life-bearing worlds increase, and there’s no reason why Pluto should be left by the wayside as we continue to science and explore these worlds unknown. With an active geology and the prospect of a subsurface ocean, this is why we will find life on Pluto, and why we must go back. 

As always, keep doing science & keep looking up!

Sources: WLRN, Phys.org, European Space Agency, EarthSky, Forbes, University of Wisconsin-Madison, NASA Europa Clipper Mission, NASA, Britannica, ABC News, NASA Solar System Exploration, Johns Hopkins University, Scientific American

MS in Geological Sciences
Laurence Tognetti is a six-year USAF Veteran who earned both a BSc and MSc from the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University. Laurence is extremely passionate about outer space and science communication, and is the author of “Outer Solar System Moons: Your Personal 3D Journey”.
You May Also Like
MAY 06, 2022
Space & Astronomy
Two Largest Marsquakes Recorded to Date FTW!
MAY 06, 2022
Two Largest Marsquakes Recorded to Date FTW!
On November 26, 2018, NASA’s InSight Mars Lander touched down on the Red Planet with the purpose of studying the i ...
APR 30, 2022
Chemistry & Physics
Dying Stars Can Give Birth to Planets too
APR 30, 2022
Dying Stars Can Give Birth to Planets too
It has been known for ages that the Earth orbits around the Sun along with 7 more planets and dwarf planets among many o ...
MAY 05, 2022
Chemistry & Physics
Did Asteroids Bring Life to Earth?
MAY 05, 2022
Did Asteroids Bring Life to Earth?
For life to exist, five informational units of DNA and RNA are required. These units are called nucleobases and are esse ...
JUN 18, 2022
Space & Astronomy
This Day in Science History 6/18/1983: The space shuttle Challenger is launched carrying Sally Ride, the first American woman in space.
JUN 18, 2022
This Day in Science History 6/18/1983: The space shuttle Challenger is launched carrying Sally Ride, the first American woman in space.
On this day in history 39 years ago NASA Astronaut Sally Kristen Ride became the first American woman in space, the firs ...
JUN 24, 2022
Space & Astronomy
Dying Stars Could Enrich the Interstellar Medium with Carbon Nanotubes
JUN 24, 2022
Dying Stars Could Enrich the Interstellar Medium with Carbon Nanotubes
In a paper recently accepted for publication in the Journal of Physical Chemistry A, researchers at the University of Ar ...
JUL 21, 2022
Infographics
NASA Artemis Moon Program
JUL 21, 2022
NASA Artemis Moon Program
Humans haven’t stepped foot on the Moon since 1972, but NASA’s Artemis Moon Program aims to break that strea ...
Loading Comments...