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SEP 17, 2020 2:00 PM PDT

Keynote Presentation: The formation of an International Collaborative Network to find COVID-19 Therapeutics

C.E. Credits: P.A.C.E. CE Florida CE
Speakers
  • Chief Operating Officer, Quantitative Biosciences Institute (QBI)
    Biography

      Jacqueline Fabius obtained her undergraduate degree from Hamilton College in Comparative Literature and Spanish. She worked in media and management consulting for 11 years prior to joining the United Nations and later UCSF in the role of the Chief Operating Officer for the Quantitative Biosciences Institute, where she heads a number of initiatives including establishing relationships and collaborations as well as media and communication strategy for the institute. In alignment with QBI’s mission to bring young investigators and women scientists to the forefront at QBI, she started the Scholarship for Women from Developing Nations. Her focus is facilitating communication and networking across wide audiences ranging from scientists to lay audience.

    • Professor of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, UCSF, Principal Investigator, Gladstone Institute of Data Science and Biotechnology, Director of the Quantitative Bioscience Institute
      Biography

        Nevan Krogan, PhD, is a molecular biologist, UC San Francisco professor, and director of the intensely interdisciplinary Quantitative Biosciences Institute (QBI) under the UCSF School of Pharmacy. He is also a senior investigator at the Gladstone Institutes. He led the work to create the SARS-CoV-2 interactome and assembled the QBI Coronavirus Research Group (QCRG), which includes hundreds of scientists from around the world. His research focuses on developing and using unbiased, quantitative systems approaches to study a wide variety of diseases with the ultimate goal of developing new therapeutics. Nevan serves as Director of The HARC Center, an NIH-funded collaborative group that focuses on the structural characterization of HIV-human protein complexes. Dr. Krogan is also the co-Director of three Cell Mapping initiatives, the Cancer Cell Mapping Initiative (CCMI), the Host Pathogen Map Initiative (HPMI) and the Psychiatric Cell Map Initiative (PCMI). These initiatives map the gene and protein networks in healthy and diseased cells with these maps being used to better understand disease and provide novel therapies to fight them. He has authored over 250 papers in the fields of genetics and molecular biology and has given over 250 lectures and seminars around the world. He is a Searle Scholar, a Keck Distinguished Scholar and was recently awarded the Roddenberry Prize for Biomedical Research.


      Abstract

      The Quantitative Biosciences Institute (QBI) at UCSF is an institute that focuses on collaborations and established itself as an important hub for novel biomedical research and technology development both domestically and internationally. QBI has also become synonymous with collaborations across the globe to bring scientists together, and as a result was perfectly situated for the formation of the QBI Coronavirus Research Group (QCRG).

      For the first time, forty-two leading laboratories, involving hundreds of scientists within the Quantitative Biosciences Institute (QBI) at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), are combining their efforts, technologies and expertise to fight the coronavirus pandemic. Many of our laboratories have previously collaborated in the investigation of other human pathogens including HIV, Ebola, Dengue, Zika, Herpesvirus, Hepatitis C, Tuberculosis, Chlamydia and West Nile Fever, revealing impactful new ways to treat these diseases.

      The newly formed QCRG (QBI Coronavirus Research Group) is bringing together expertise in biochemistry, virology, structural, computational, chemical and systems biology to understand how SARS-CoV-2 hijacks human cells for its own replication and rapidly develop treatments. We are using a combination of mass spectrometry, CRISPR-based genetics and structural analysis through Cryo-EM to systematically generate a viral-human interaction map involving all 29 SARS-CoV-2 proteins.

      We identified 66 druggable human proteins at the virus-host interface, targeted by 69 compounds (of which, 29 drugs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, 12 are in clinical trials and 28 are preclinical compounds).

      In a separate study building on these results, we created a quantitative mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics survey of SARS-CoV-2 infection in cell culture. We identified 87 drugs and compounds by mapping global phosphorylation profiles to dysregulated kinases and pathways. Pharmacologic inhibition of p38, CK2, CDKs, AXL and PIKFYVE kinases possessed antiviral efficacy, representing potential COVID-19 therapies. Clinical trials with some drugs and compounds implicated by our studies are currently being discussed or are already underway.

      Learning Objectives:

      1. Understanding the integral value of collaboration for advancement in scientific research; how to establish and grow academic, Pharma, and industry connections

      2. Learn about how the coronavirus hijacks and re-wires our genes and proteins during infection

      3. How to integrate different datatypes to derive informed testable hypothesis relating to COVID-19

      4. How to identify potential therapeutics that can inform clinical trials


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