MAR 20, 2014 10:00 AM PDT

Impairments of brain network connectivity in autism

Presented at: Neuroscience
Speaker

Abstract

With a rising prevalence recently exceeding 1%, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has become a pressing public health issue. Crucial hurdles on the way to targeted treatments are (i) the reliance on behavioral diagnostic criteria for disorder known to be neurological in nature, and (ii) the lack of knowledge about biologically defined subtypes that may be linked to identifiable sets of genetic (and environmental) risk factors. Despite a plethora of neuroscientific findings, fully sensitive and specific brain biomarkers have not been identified. However, there are strong indications from genetics, postmortem literature, and neuroimaging supporting the investigation of brain network connectivity as a promising source of the needed biomarkers. Functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) has been one widely applied method, but with a recently grown awareness of methodological issues, the initial model of general underconnectivity has to be revised in favor of concepts such as impaired network integration and differentiation in ASD. Anatomical connectivity has been primarily studied with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), with findings supporting atypical age-related changes in tract maturation and organization as well as widespread white matter compromise in adolescents and adults with ASD. Multimodal imaging approaches will be crucial for a more comprehensive understanding of network abnormalities in ASD, but findings from fcMRI and DTI reflect different parameters of connectivity and do not always coincide. The mandate of hypothesis-driven investigation may create as much harm as good in the specific case of ASD research, as data-mining techniques (such as machine learning diagnostic classification) may be uniquely suited to uncover complex patterns of biomarkers.


Show Resources
You May Also Like
SEP 14, 2021 7:00 AM PDT
C.E. CREDITS
SEP 14, 2021 7:00 AM PDT
Date: September 14, 2021 Time: 7am PDT, 10am EDT, 4pm CEST A conventional thermal cycler has long been a commodity product in the lab and end-point PCR techniques can be completed almost wit...
MAY 11, 2021 10:00 AM PDT
C.E. CREDITS
MAY 11, 2021 10:00 AM PDT
Date: May 11, 2021 Time: 10:00zm PDT Your samples are some of the most valuable assets in the laboratory. After spending countless hours on extraction and preparation, your conclusions could...
SEP 17, 2021 12:00 PM CST
C.E. CREDITS
SEP 17, 2021 12:00 PM CST
Date: September 16, 2021 Time: 9:00pm (PDT), 12:00am (EDT) 3D cellular models like organoids and spheroids offer an opportunity to better understand complex biology in a physiologically rele...
JUN 09, 2021 7:00 AM PDT
C.E. CREDITS
JUN 09, 2021 7:00 AM PDT
Date: June 9, 2021 Time: 09 June 2021, 7am PDT, 10am EDT, 4pm CEST cells with dramatic implications on the validity of past cell culture related research. The fact that at least 509 cell lin...
OCT 20, 2021 10:00 AM PDT
C.E. CREDITS
OCT 20, 2021 10:00 AM PDT
Date: October 20, 2021 Time:10:00am (PDT), 1:00pm (EDT) As the prevalence of Diabetes continues to rise in many areas across the globe, healthcare providers continue to look for methods that...
JUL 15, 2021 9:00 AM PDT
JUL 15, 2021 9:00 AM PDT
Date: July 15, 2021 Time: 9:00am (PDT), 12:00pm (EDT) The Pisces workflow robust, easy-to-use, end-to-end multi-omics solution for highly multiplexed targeted Spatial RNA analysis. VeranomeB...
MAR 20, 2014 10:00 AM PDT

Impairments of brain network connectivity in autism

Presented at: Neuroscience

Specialty

Health

Chemistry

Medicine

Clinical Diagnostics

Research

Lab Testing

Molecular Diagnostics

Dementia

Immunology

Neurology

Clinical Research

Research And Development

Serology

Neuropsychology

Microbiology

Geography

Asia50%

North America25%

Europe25%

Registration Source

Website Visitors100%

Job Title

Clinical Laboratory Scientist50%

Medical Laboratory Technician50%

Organization

Contract Research Organization (Cro)25%

Academic Institution25%

Manufacturer - Other25%

Other25%


Show Resources
Loading Comments...
Show Resources